Trump-a-day

President Donald Trump has sent more than two dozen tweets about Hurricane Harvey before flying to Texas to view the damage himself. Up to 30,000 people lost their homes in Houston alone. Altogether 450,000 people are victims of the tropical storm turned hurricane. 


For the first time in their lives the president and the First Lady have travelled to a natural disaster zone, and their briefing did not cover dresscode. Or did it?

For those who care, Melania had a change of shoes on Air Force One. By the time they landed in Corpus Christi, where Harvey made landfall, she’d changed into white sneakers. She has also succumbed to the branded hat. For the first time. Although, unlike her shoes, that did not break Twitter.


Republicans are cognisant of President George W. Bush’s widely criticised handling of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and some have urged Trump to take a more proactive approach. Trump promised swift emergency funding to help Texas recover from the hurricane, though Republican congressional leaders haven’t yet sent clear signals on how they will proceed. The full scope of damage isn’t yet known with rain expected to last several more days. 

My thoughts are going to all the people who lost everything and are full of uncertainty about their future. Is Trump capable of achieving more than sending tweets? 

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As the internet has pointed out several times throughout President Trump’s first months in office: there is always a tweet for that. 

As Trump heads to Texas to survey the flooding and damage brought by Hurricane Harvey, a number of Twitter users have pointed out that the president is about to do exactly what he criticised former President Barack Obama for doing when Superstorm Sandy hit the east coast in 2012.


The irony of Trump doing exactly what he criticised Obama for doing was not lost on people. In fact, there is an entire Reddit community dedicated to finding old tweets of Trump’s that criticise things he’s doing as president. 


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Americans do not hold President Trump in high regard, with most suggesting he is dishonest, unstable, prejudiced and selfish, according to a survey released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center. The criticisms of the country’s 45th president do not end there, with a strong majority (58%) of Americans similarly indicating that they largely disagree with both Trump’s policies and his conduct since entering the White House. While 25% of respondents have mixed feelings, only 16% said they liked how the president conducted himself.

Split that up by political affiliation, and the results show that Democrats and those who lean Democratic are much more likely to disapprove of Trump’s conduct (89%), while Republicans and people who lean Republican are more likely to have mixed feelings about it (46%).

The poll surveyed 1,893 Americans from Aug. 15 to Aug. 21.

Trump, however, sees things differently.

ISIS? What Bills? Who’s ‘fake news’ now?

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The holiday season is over and now is the time for highly anticipated political reads, hot off the press. Last week, we talked about the upcoming release of Hillary Clinton’s memoir with an existential title What Happened.

Another soon to be released must read comes from Alec Baldwin: 

In this parody, Baldwin brings his famously satirical Saturday Night Live impersonation of the commander in chief to book form. Published by Penguin Press, the book is on sale in the US on 7 November. 

This year, I have lost quite a few friends to parenthood, so the next choice is very reflective of that.


The book contains “helpful tips like what to do if you met Trump in the woods – never acknowledge his bragging, never respond to his taunts. Most importantly, without an audience a Trump shrivels into an orange pile of nothing…” (quote from a person who made me aware of this book).

Trump also shared his book recommendation a few days ago.

That’s it for today. If North Korea and Trump do not blow up the world overnight, please check for new posts tomorrow.

Trump-a-day

U.K. foreign secretary Boris Johnson finally caught up on the trans-Atlantic news, specifically, Donald Trump’s response to the Charlottesville, Virginia, riots. Johnson told BBC Radio Four’s Today programme: “I thought he [Donald Trump] got it totally wrong and I thought it was a great shame that he failed to make a clear and fast distinction, which we all are able to make, between fascists and anti-fascists, between Nazis and anti-Nazis.” The state visit was more likely to happen next year than this, he added.


In case you missed it, earlier this year, Johnson praised praises Trump’s tweets for ‘engaging people.’ In a July interview with Today programme, the foreign secretary intimated he was envious of the freedom with which Trump expressed his views on Twitter, despite the intense criticism the president has faced over his use of the network.

“Donald Trump’s approach to politics has been something that has gripped the imagination of people around the world. He has engaged people in politics in a way that we haven’t seen for a long time, with his tweets and all the rest of it. I certainly wouldn’t be allowed to tweet in the way that he does, much as I might like to. I’m seeing my Foreign Office minders looking extremely apprehensive here,” Johnson said. Well, Boris, Trump should not be allowed either, because his “foot in mouth” disease is how “the rest of it” became normal. Trump is doing ten things a day that, in normal times, even just one would be a proper scandal.

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“What do we want?”

“The wall!”

Alec Baldwin reprised his President Trump portrayal on NBC’s “Saturday Night Live: Weekend Update Summer Edition.” 

Baldwin mocked Trump’s raucous rally earlier this week and jabbed Trump for attacking the media over coverage of his response to the violence in Charlottesville that was roundly criticized.

“As we all know, there was a tragic victim that came out of Charlottesville – me,” Baldwin’s Trump said. “Folks, the media has treated me so unfairly by reporting my entire remarks, even the bad ones.”

Baldwin’s Trump addressed holding a campaign rally three years before the next presidential election, saying “it’s never too early to campaign for 2020. Mike Pence is already doing it.”

His Trump character also played up his primetime speech to the nation on Afghanistan earlier this week, saying he had “solved” the problem with a U.S. strategy in the country. “I sat down with our military, we looked at the map and I asked the hard questions, like which one is Afghanistan?” Baldwin’s Trump said.


Baldwin has played Trump on “Saturday Night Live” for the last year and re-appeared on the special summer episode of the show after confirming in June that he would return to the show this fall to portray the president. Thanks, Alec, it would have been a shame not to!

Trump-a-day

President Trump on Wednesday called for the nation to come together in “shared humanity” and “citizenship,” one day after giving a speech which resembled a “greatest hits” package from his presidential campaign (including pledges to boost the economy; crack down on illegal immigration, in part by building the border wall; and drain the Washington swamp).

“It is time to heal the wounds that divide us and to seek a new unity based on the common values that unite us,” Trump told a crowd of veterans at an American Legion conference in Reno, Nevada.

Sticking largely to his prepared remarks, the president pointed to the military as a positive example for all Americans when it comes to patriotism, hard work and common purpose, saying “we are one people, with one home and one flag.” (Minus, the transgender military ban, of course.)

“We are not defined by the colour of our skin, the figure on our pay check or the party of our politics,” Trump said. “We are defined by our shared humanity, our citizenship in this magnificent nation and by the love that fills our hearts. We are people who love. We are people with heart. We are people who adore. We are people who are great — there is no country like the United States of America. We have no division too deep for us to heal,” the president said, concluding his remarks. We are people who adore? Was his speechwriter previously employed as a junior screenwriter for Hollywood’s summer rom-coms?!

Many Republicans wish Trump would move on from Charlottesville, an incident that resulted in one of the worst stretches of his presidency (clearly testing his “no division too deep for us to heal” theory). Trump seems to believe it’s an issue that animates his core supporters. That says a lot about the true colour of his adoration. Remember Michelle Obama’s quote “being president doesn’t change who you are. It reveals who you are.”

For all the rhetorical fireworks, it is difficult to see how this week’s speeches changed anyone’s opinion of him — for better or for worse.

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The chances of a government shutdown in the fall are growing. Congress returns to Washington next month facing a full plate of radioactive, must-pass legislation and a shutdown threat that looks more serious after President Trump suggested he would not support a spending package that omits new funds for a southern border wall.

Speaker Paul Ryan in his unique self-doubting speaking style pushed back at Trump’s suggestion that border wall funding is worth a shutdown. “I don’t think a government shutdown is necessary, and I don’t think most people want to see a government shutdown, ourselves included,” Ryan said during a visit to an Intel facility in Oregon. He also explained that the president is merely “employing a strategy that he thinks is effective for him.” 

Good luck to GOP leaders in their quest to find a legislative sweet-spot that satisfies the president’s border-wall demand without alienating the Democrats, whose votes will be essential to keep the government running. “Democrats have made clear we will not support funding for President Trump’s misguided, ineffective border wall,” Joseph Crowley, chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, said this week.

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The White House Self-Appointed Warrior Princess, aka aide Kellyanne Conway, went after Hillary Clinton for “making excuses.” “She failed to make history and she succeeds at making excuses. And that is emblematic of a Democratic Party now that is so bereft of ideas and issues that they have to then play armchair psychiatrists.” 


Conway’s comments come after excerpts of Clinton’s new book “What Happened” were released earlier this week, in which she wrote that President Trump’s attempts to intimidate her during the presidential campaign made her “skin crawl.” Hillary said it as it was. “What would you do? Do you stay calm, keep smiling and carry on as if he weren’t repeatedly invading your space?”

As for Kellyanne, what does she even do when she is not on Fox insulting people and passing her judgment as a gospel?

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This week, the White House reveals its new look, including the new wallpaper personally chosen by Trump himself. My gran used to have a similar wallpaper in the living room, in circa 1989.


Earlier this month, Trump denied that he called the White House a “dump.” Trump responded on Twitter to an article on the website golf.com. The story recounts a scene in which Trump was chatting with some club members at his golf course in Bedminster, New Jersey. He reportedly told the members he visits the property so frequently because “that White House is a real dump.” Hopefully now that he was involved in decision making over the wallpaper, he feels more at home there.


For more visuals of the White House interior designs check https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/gallery/2017/aug/23/white-house-renovations-donald-trump

Trump-a-day

President Trump on Monday announced he will not pull out U.S. troops from Afghanistan, as he is committed to a new strategy aimed at winning the nation’s longest war. 

During a prime-time address to the nation, Trump declared a rapid exit from the war-torn nation would leave a major power vacuum that would create a new safe haven for terrorist groups like al Qaeda and the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS). The president acknowledged his “original instinct was to pull out,” a reference to his long-held view and campaign promise. Trump admitted that the calculation is different “when you sit behind the desk in the Oval Office.” Well, he was mentally present during at least one intelligence briefing on the matter, we have to give him that. Although, winning the war and building the peace are two different things, and it is the peace building process that Afghanistan is lacking.

Overall, it was a “very Trump” speech, as he declined to provide specifics or anything resembling a plan; showed he was pro-war, not peace; and blamed previous administrations. “When I became president I was given a bad and very complex hand,” Trump asserted. “No one denies that we have inherited a challenging and troubling situation in Afghanistan and South Asia, but we do not have the luxury of going back in time and making different or better decisions.” (Oh, I am sure quite a few people would love to go back to 8 November 2016 and make better decisions).

“The American people are weary of war without victory. I share the American people’s frustration,” Trump said, adding that, “in the end, we will fight and we will win.” Good luck! How will that look like, a total eradication of al Qaeda?

While the president is widely expected to send roughly 4,000 additional U.S. troops to the country, a recommendation made by the Pentagon, Trump declined to say how many troops he would send or reveal a firm timeline for how long they would serve there. There are roughly 8,400 American service members currently in Afghanistan. Most troops train and advise the Afghan military, but roughly 2,000 participate in counterterrorism missions. “We will not talk about numbers of troops or our plan for further military activities,” Trump said. “Conditions on the ground, not arbitrary timetables, will guide our strategy for now on. … I will not say when we are going to attack, but attack we will.” Presidential Speechmaking 101: avoid facts in your promises, as they might stick and be held against you.

Unlike past administrations, the president said he does not seek to encourage Afghanistan to adopt Western-style democracy and institutions — just to ensure it does not become a refuge for extremist groups. No surprise here, coming from someone who mightily dislikes free press, women rights, gay rights, and pretty much approves of Neo-Nazis (think of his assertion that “very fine people” were on both sides of the clashes between white supremacists and protestors in Charlottesville, Va.). Do not get me wrong, I am not advocating for Western-style democracy in countries that have no history of democracy. I am 100% for equality and education everywhere in the world, though. 

Senator John McCain, who has spent months bashing President Trump for delaying a new Afghanistan strategy, commended him for “taking a big step in the right direction with the new strategy for Afghanistan.” Have you noticed that Trump always gets commended by one or two of his numerous critics on those rare occasions when he manages to stick to the prepared speech?

Contrary to McCain, Senator Jack Reed, ranking Democrat on the Armed Services panel, called the plan “very vague” and said it was “short on the details our troops and the American people deserve.”

Some people dared to say that Trump’s presidency is becoming ordinary (clearly, not Twitter users).


 “Trump still has every opportunity to turn around his presidency,” said Alex Conant, a GOP strategist. “Look, a lot of presidents have rough first years and go on to be very successful, and there is no reason Trump can’t do that.” Although even Conant’s optimistic outlook has its limits with regard to the president’s impetuous ways. “Trump will continue to follow his instincts, which will continue to lead him into trouble,” he said. 

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During a town hall with CNN in Racine, Wisconsin, House Speaker Paul Ryan said he wishes President Trump would tweet less, noting there are posts on Twitter he would prefer not to see from the commander-in-chief. “Do I wish there would be a little less tweeting? Of course, I do. But I think, I don’t think that that’s going to change.” I think he thinks right, even though he has a very roundabout way of expressing his thoughts.